Stars Wars Silver Pocket Watch Necklace Chain The Last Jedi Return of Sci Fi USA

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Seller: Top-Rated Seller anddownthewaterfall (17.524) 99.3%, Location: Take a Look at My Other Items, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 312331588810 Star Wars Pocket Watch Silver Star Wars Pocket Watch With the words "Star Wars" on the case and a vintage pattern on the back The Dial is black with "Star Wars" on the clock face The watch is half hunter and is opened by pressing the top The Clock is 45mm in diameter and the chain is 80mm long Brand New in Excellent Condition Starting at a Penny...With No Reserve..If your the only bidder you win it for 1p....Grab a Bargain!!!! I have other Star Wars items on Ebay so Please.... ....Check out my other items! Bid with Confidence please read my 100% Positive feedback from over 14,000 satisfied customerRead how quickly they receive their items - I post all my items within 24 hours of receiving payment International customers are welcome. I have shipped items to over 120 countries International orders may require longer handling time if held up at customs If there is a problem I always give a full refund Returns are acceptedIf your unhappy with your item please return it for a full refund I am a UK Seller with 6 Years of eBay Selling Experience Why not treat yourself? I always combine multiple items and send an invoice with discounted postage I leave instant feedback upon receiving yours All payment methods accepted from all countries in all currencies Are you looking for a Interesting conversation piece? A birthday present for the person who has everything?A comical gift to cheer someone up? or a special unique gift just to say thank you? You now know where to look for a bargain! Be sure to add me to your favourites list!Please click here If you want to take a look at my other ebay auctions other items!Most of my auctions start at a penny with No ReserveGood Luck with the Bidding!The Countries I Send to Include Afghanistan * Albania * Algeria * American Samoa (US) * Andorra * Angola * Anguilla (GB) * Antigua and Barbuda * Argentina * Armenia * Aruba (NL) * Australia * Austria * Azerbaijan * Bahamas * Bahrain * Bangladesh * Barbados * Belarus * Belgium * Belize * Benin * Bermuda (GB) * Bhutan * Bolivia * Bonaire (NL) * Bosnia and Herzegovina * Botswana * Bouvet Island (NO) * Brazil * British Indian Ocean Territory (GB) * British Virgin Islands (GB) * Brunei * Bulgaria * Burkina Faso * Burundi * Cambodia * Cameroon * Canada * Cape Verde * Cayman Islands (GB) * Central African Republic * Chad * Chile * China * Christmas Island (AU) * Cocos Islands (AU) * Colombia * Comoros * Congo * Democratic Republic of the Congo * Cook Islands (NZ) * Coral Sea Islands Territory (AU) * Costa Rica * Croatia * Cuba * Curaçao (NL) * Cyprus * Czech Republic * Denmark * Djibouti * Dominica * Dominican Republic * East Timor * Ecuador * Egypt * El Salvador * Equatorial Guinea * Eritrea * Estonia * Ethiopia * Falkland Islands (GB) * Faroe Islands (DK) * Fiji Islands * Finland * France * French Guiana (FR) * French Polynesia (FR) * French Southern Lands (FR) * Gabon * Gambia * Georgia * Germany * Ghana * Gibraltar (GB) * Greece * Greenland (DK) * Grenada * Guadeloupe (FR) * Guam (US) * Guatemala * Guernsey (GB) * Guinea * Guinea-Bissau * Guyana * Haiti * Heard and McDonald Islands (AU) * Honduras * Hong Kong (CN) * Hungary * Iceland * India * Indonesia * Iran * Iraq * Ireland * Isle of Man (GB) * Israel * Italy * Jamaica * Jan Mayen (NO) * Japan * Jersey (GB) * Jordan * Kazakhstan * Kenya * Kiribati * Kosovo * Kuwait * Kyrgyzstan * Laos * Latvia * Lebanon * Lesotho * Liberia * Libya * Liechtenstein * Lithuania * Luxembourg * Macau (CN) * Macedonia * Madagascar * Malawi * Malaysia * Maldives * Mali * Malta * Marshall Islands * Martinique (FR) * Mauritania * Mauritius * Mayotte (FR) * Mexico * Micronesia * Moldova * Monaco * Mongolia * Montenegro * Montserrat (GB) * Morocco * Mozambique * Myanmar * Namibia * Nauru * Navassa (US) * Nepal * Netherlands * New Caledonia (FR) * New Zealand * Nicaragua * Niger * Nigeria * Niue (NZ) * Norfolk Island (AU) * North Korea * Northern Cyprus * Northern Mariana Islands (US) * Norway * Oman * Pakistan * Palau * Palestinian Authority * Panama * Papua New Guinea * Paraguay * Peru * Philippines * Pitcairn Island (GB) * Poland * Portugal * Puerto Rico (US) * Qatar * Reunion (FR) * Romania * Russia * Rwanda * Saba (NL) * Saint Barthelemy (FR) * Saint Helena (GB) * Saint Kitts and Nevis * Saint Lucia * Saint Martin (FR) * Saint Pierre and Miquelon (FR) * Saint Vincent and the Grenadines * Samoa * San Marino * Sao Tome and Principe * Saudi Arabia * Senegal * Serbia * Seychelles * Sierra Leone * Singapore * Sint Eustatius (NL) * Sint Maarten (NL) * Slovakia * Slovenia * Solomon Islands * Somalia * South Africa * South Georgia (GB) * South Korea * South Sudan * Spain * Sri Lanka * Sudan * Suriname * Svalbard (NO) * Swaziland * Sweden * Switzerland * Syria * Taiwan * Tajikistan * Tanzania * Thailand * Togo * Tokelau (NZ) * Tonga * Trinidad and Tobago * Tunisia * Turkey * Turkmenistan * Turks and Caicos Islands (GB) * Tuvalu * U.S. Minor Pacific Islands (US) * U.S. Virgin Islands (US) * Uganda * Ukraine * United Arab Emirates * United Kingdom * United States * Uruguay * Uzbekistan * Vanuatu * Vatican City * Venezuela * Vietnam * Wallis and Futuna (FR) * Yemen * Zambia * Zimbabwe Star Wars is an American epic space opera media franchise, centered on a film series created by George Lucas. It depicts the adventures of various characters "a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away".The franchise began in 1977 with the release of the film Star Wars (later subtitled Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981),[3][4] which became a worldwide pop culture phenomenon. It was followed by the successful sequels The Empire Strikes Back (1980) and Return of the Jedi (1983); these three films constitute the original Star Wars trilogy. A prequel trilogy was released between 1999 and 2005, which received mixed reactions from both critics and fans. A sequel trilogy began in 2015 with the release of Star Wars: The Force Awakens. All seven films were nominated for Academy Awards (with wins going to the first two films released) and have been commercial successes, with a combined box office revenue of over US$7.5 billion,[5] making Star Wars the third highest-grossing film series.[6] Spin-off films include the animated Star Wars: The Clone Wars (2008) and Rogue One (2016), the latter of which is the first in a planned series of anthology films.The series has spawned an extensive media franchise including books, television series, computer and video games, theme park attractions and lands, and comic books, resulting in significant development of the series' fictional universe. Star Wars also holds a Guinness World Records title for the "Most successful film merchandising franchise". In 2015, the total value of the Star Wars franchise was estimated at US$42 billion,[7][8] making Star Wars the second highest-grossing media franchise of all time.In 2012, The Walt Disney Company bought Lucasfilm for US$4.06 billion and earned the distribution rights to all subsequent Star Wars films, beginning with the release of The Force Awakens in 2015.[9] The former distributor, 20th Century Fox, retains the physical distribution rights for the first two Star Wars trilogies, owns permanent rights for the original 1977 film and continues to hold the rights for the prequel trilogy and the first two sequels to A New Hope until May 2020.[10][11] Walt Disney Studios owns digital distribution rights to all the Star Wars films, excluding A New Hope. Star Wars: The Last Jedi (also known as Star Wars: Episode VIII – The Last Jedi[4]) is an upcoming American epic space opera film written and directed by Rian Johnson. It is the second film in the Star Wars sequel trilogy, following Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015). The film is produced by Lucasfilm and will be distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures. It stars Mark Hamill, Carrie Fisher, Adam Driver, Daisy Ridley, John Boyega, Oscar Isaac, Andy Serkis, Lupita Nyong'o, Domhnall Gleeson, Anthony Daniels, and Gwendoline Christie in returning roles. New cast members include Kelly Marie Tran, Laura Dern, and Benicio del Toro. Fisher died in December 2016, making The Last Jedi her final film role.The film was announced after Disney's acquisition of Lucasfilm in October 2012. It is produced by Ram Bergman and Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy. John Williams, composer for the previous seven films, returns to compose the score. Scenes that required shooting at Skellig Michael in Ireland were filmed during pre-production in September 2015, with principal photography beginning at Pinewood Studios in England in February 2016 and ending in July 2016. Post-production wrapped up in September 2017.[5] The Last Jedi is scheduled for release on December 15, 2017.A sequel, tentatively titled Star Wars: Episode IX, is scheduled for December 2019. A pocket watch (or pocketwatch) is a watch that is made to be carried in a pocket, as opposed to a wristwatch, which is strapped to the wrist.They were the most common type of watch from their development in the 16th century until wristwatches became popular after World War I during which a transitional design, trench watches, were used by the military. Pocket watches generally have an attached chain to allow them to be secured to a waistcoat, lapel, or belt loop, and to prevent them from being dropped. Watches were also mounted on a short leather strap or fob, when a long chain would have been cumbersome or likely to catch on things. This fob could also provide a protective flap over their face and crystal. Women's watches were normally of this form, with a watch fob that was more decorative than protective. Chains were frequently decorated with a silver or enamel pendant, often carrying the arms of some club or society, which by association also became known as a fob. Ostensibly practical gadgets such as a watch winding key, vesta case, or a cigar cutter also appeared on watch chains, although usually in an overly decorated style. Also common are fasteners designed to be put through a buttonhole and worn in a jacket or waistcoat, this sort being frequently associated with and named after train conductors.An early reference to the pocket watch is in a letter in November 1462 from the Italian clockmaker Bartholomew Manfredi to the Marchese di Mantova Federico Gonzaga,[citation needed] where he offers him a "pocket clock" better than that belonging to the Duke of Modena. By the end of the 15th century, spring-driven clocks appeared in Italy, and in Germany. Peter Henlein, a master locksmith of Nuremberg, was regularly manufacturing pocket watches by 1524. Thereafter, pocket watch manufacture spread throughout the rest of Europe as the 16th century progressed. Early watches only had an hour hand, the minute hand appearing in the late 17th century.[1][2] The first American pocket watches with machine made parts were manufactured by Henry Pitkin with his brother in the later 1830s.Star Wars: The Last JediCharactersLuke Skywalker General Leia Organa Kylo Ren Rey Finn Poe Dameron Maz Kanata Supreme Leader Snoke General Hux C-3PO Chewbacca BB-8 Captain Phasma R2-D2 Admiral Ackbar Nien NunbStarshipsA-wing Millennium Falcon Star Destroyer TIE fighter X-wing fighterVehiclesAT-M6Tie-in mediaJourney to Star Wars: The Last Jedi[hide] v t eStar WarsFeaturefilmsSagaStar Wars (1977) The Empire Strikes Back (1980) Return of the Jedi (1983) The Phantom Menace (1999) Attack of the Clones (2002) Revenge of the Sith (2005) The Force Awakens (2015) The Last Jedi (2017)AnthologyRogue One (2016) Solo (2018)OtherThe Clone Wars (2008)Televisionand radioFilmsHoliday Special (1978) Caravan of Courage (1984) The Battle for Endor (1985)SeriesDroids (1985–1986) Ewoks (1985–1986) Clone Wars (2003–2005) The Clone Wars (2008–2014) cast episodes Rebels (2014–) characters episodes Forces of Destiny (2017–) Detours (unaired) Radio dramas (1981–1996)OthermediaGames andmultimediaVideo games list Shadows of the Empire (1996) Knights of the Old Republic (2003–2005) The Force Unleashed (2008–2010) The Old Republic (2011–)Literatureand artworkArt Books non-fiction Comics list LegendsSettingCharactersJedi Sith Stormtrooper Clone trooperConceptsArchitecture Creatures / Species Languages The Force Physics Planets and moonsEventsClone Wars Galactic Civil WarOrganizationsFirst Order Galactic Empire Galactic Republic New Republic Rebel AllianceTechnologyWeapons Blaster Death Star Lightsaber Vehicles Landspeeder TIE fighter X-wing fighter Star Destroyer Millennium FalconProductionGeorge Lucas Lucasfilm Canon Cast Changes in film re-releases Filming locations Music Opening crawl Sequel trilogy Sources and analoguesCulturalimpactAttractionsA Galactic Spectacular Jedi Training: Trials of the Temple Star Tours The Adventures Continue Galaxy's Edge Star Wars Hotel Star Wars Launch Bay Star Wars Weekends Where Science Meets ImaginationLegoList of sets TV series The Yoda Chronicles (2013–2014) Droid Tales (2015) The Resistance Rises (2016) The Freemaker Adventures (2016–) Video gamesMerchandiseAction figures Kenner list Hasbro Vintage Collection Star Wars Transformers Games Star Wars Pez Manga Force Trainer Shepperton Design Studios Trading cards Vinylmation Star Wars Rollinz toysParodiesHardware Wars (1978) Spaceballs (1987) Star Warped (1997) Thumb Wars (1999) George Lucas in Love (1999) Robot Chicken: Star Wars (2007) Laugh It Up, Fuzzball: The Family Guy Trilogy (2007–10) The People vs. George Lucas (2010)Other501st Legion Comparison to Star Trek Fan films Force for Change Jedi census Jediism Rebel Legion Star Wars Celebration Star Wars Day Star Wars: In Concert Star Wars Insider Wookieepedia TheForce.Net Yoda conditionsWikipedia book Book Category Category Portal Portal[hide] v t eLucasfilmProductionsFilmsAmerican Graffiti (1973) Star Wars (1977) More American Graffiti (1979) The Empire Strikes Back (1980) Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) Return of the Jedi (1983) Twice Upon a Time (1983) Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984) Latino (1985) Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters (1985) Labyrinth (1986) Howard the Duck (1986) Tucker: The Man and His Dream (1988) Willow (1988) The Land Before Time (1988) Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989) Radioland Murders (1994) Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace (1999) Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones (2002) Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith (2005) Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008) Star Wars: The Clone Wars (2008) Red Tails (2012) Strange Magic (2015) Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015) Rogue One (2016) Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017) Solo (2018)TV seriesStar Wars: Droids (1985–86) Star Wars: Ewoks (1985–86) Maniac Mansion (1990–93) The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles (1992–93) Star Wars: Clone Wars (2003–05) Star Wars: The Clone Wars (2008–14) Star Wars Rebels (2014–present) Lego Star Wars: The Freemaker Adventures (2016–present) Star Wars Detours (unaired)TV filmsCaravan of Courage: An Ewok Adventure (1984) Ewoks: The Battle for Endor (1985)Theme parkfilmsCaptain EO (1986) Star Tours (1987) ExtraTERRORestrial Alien Encounter (1995) Star Tours – The Adventures Continue (2011)FranchisesStar Wars Indiana JonesRelatedproductionsTHX 1138 (1971)DivisionsIndustrial Light & Magic Skywalker Sound Lucasfilm Animation LucasArtsFormer divisionsThe Droid Works EditDroid Graphics Group (Pixar) Kerner Optical SoundDroid THXPeopleGeorge Lucas (Founder) Kathleen Kennedy (President) Howard Roffman (EVP, Franchise Management)Parent: Walt Disney Studios (The Walt Disney Company)[hide] v t eFilms directed by Rian JohnsonBrick (2005) The Brothers Bloom (2008) Looper (2012) Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017) Star WarsFeaturefilmsSagaStar Wars (1977) The Empire Strikes Back (1980) Return of the Jedi (1983) The Phantom Menace (1999) Attack of the Clones (2002) Revenge of the Sith (2005) The Force Awakens (2015) The Last Jedi (2017)AnthologyRogue One (2016) Solo (2018)OtherThe Clone Wars (2008)Televisionand radioFilmsHoliday Special (1978) Caravan of Courage (1984) The Battle for Endor (1985)SeriesDroids (1985–1986) Ewoks (1985–1986) Clone Wars (2003–2005) The Clone Wars (2008–2014) cast episodes Rebels (2014–) characters episodes Forces of Destiny (2017–) Detours (unaired) Radio dramas (1981–1996)OthermediaGames andmultimediaVideo games list Shadows of the Empire (1996) Knights of the Old Republic (2003–2005) The Force Unleashed (2008–2010) The Old Republic (2011–)Literatureand artworkArt Books non-fiction Comics list LegendsSettingCharactersJedi Sith Stormtrooper Clone trooperConceptsArchitecture Creatures / Species Languages The Force Physics Planets and moonsEventsClone Wars Galactic Civil WarOrganizationsFirst Order Galactic Empire Galactic Republic New Republic Rebel AllianceTechnologyWeapons Blaster Death Star Lightsaber Vehicles Landspeeder TIE fighter X-wing fighter Star Destroyer Millennium FalconProductionGeorge Lucas Lucasfilm Canon Cast Changes in film re-releases Filming locations Music Opening crawl Sequel trilogy Sources and analoguesCulturalimpactAttractionsA Galactic Spectacular Jedi Training: Trials of the Temple Star Tours The Adventures Continue Galaxy's Edge Star Wars Hotel Star Wars Launch Bay Star Wars Weekends Where Science Meets ImaginationLegoList of sets TV series The Yoda Chronicles (2013–2014) Droid Tales (2015) The Resistance Rises (2016) The Freemaker Adventures (2016–) Video gamesMerchandiseAction figures Kenner list Hasbro Vintage Collection Star Wars Transformers Games Star Wars Pez Manga Force Trainer Shepperton Design Studios Trading cards Vinylmation Star Wars Rollinz toysParodiesHardware Wars (1978) Spaceballs (1987) Star Warped (1997) Thumb Wars (1999) George Lucas in Love (1999) Robot Chicken: Star Wars (2007) Laugh It Up, Fuzzball: The Family Guy Trilogy (2007–10) The People vs. George Lucas (2010)Other501st Legion Comparison to Star Trek Fan films Force for Change Jedi census Jediism Rebel Legion Star Wars Celebration Star Wars Day Star Wars: In Concert Star Wars Insider Wookieepedia TheForce.Net Yoda conditionsWikipedia book Book Category Category Portal Portal[hide] v t eStar Wars charactersList of The Clone Wars characters List of Rebels characters List of Legends charactersCharactersCanonAdmiral Ackbar Padmé Amidala Cassian Andor Wedge Antilles Cad Bane Darth Bane BB-8 Jar Jar Binks C-3PO Lando Calrissian Chewbacca Poe Dameron Count Dooku Jyn Erso Boba Fett Jango Fett Finn Saw Gerrera Greedo Tag Greenley General Grievous Jabba the Hutt General Hux Kanan Jarrus Qui-Gon Jinn K-2SO Maz Kanata Obi-Wan Kenobi Orson Krennic Princess Leia Darth Maul Nien Nunb Bink Otauna Palpatine Captain Phasma Admiral Piett R2-D2 Kylo Ren Rey Captain Rex Bodhi Rook Bail Organa Luke Skywalker Supreme Leader Snoke Han Solo Ahsoka Tano Grand Moff Tarkin Grand Admiral Thrawn Darth Vader Asajj Ventress Watto Wicket W. Warrick Mace Windu YodaLegendsMara Jade Kyle Katarn KOTOR characters HK-47 Kreia Revan Starkiller Jacen SoloOrganizationsForce-usersJedi SithMilitaryBattle droid Clone trooper Stormtrooper Rogue SquadronFamiliesSkywalker family Solo familyBandsFigrin D'an and the Modal Nodes Max Rebo BandSpeciesBantha Ewok Hutt Sarlacc Tusken Raiders WookieesOtherDroid MandalorianCategory Category[hide] v t eStar Wars terrestrial and aerospace vehiclesTerrestrial vehiclesLandspeeder Snowspeeder Speeder bike WalkersStarfightersA-wing B-wing TIE fighter X-wing Y-wingAerospace craftsDeath Star Millennium Falcon Mon Calamari cruiser Star Destroyer Tantive IVWikipedia book Book Category Category Portal Portal WikiProject WikiProject[hide]Other Star Wars related articles[hide] v t eLucasfilmProductionsFilmsAmerican Graffiti (1973) Star Wars (1977) More American Graffiti (1979) The Empire Strikes Back (1980) Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) Return of the Jedi (1983) Twice Upon a Time (1983) Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984) Latino (1985) Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters (1985) Labyrinth (1986) Howard the Duck (1986) Tucker: The Man and His Dream (1988) Willow (1988) The Land Before Time (1988) Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989) Radioland Murders (1994) Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace (1999) Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones (2002) Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith (2005) Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008) Star Wars: The Clone Wars (2008) Red Tails (2012) Strange Magic (2015) Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015) Rogue One (2016) Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017) Solo (2018)TV seriesStar Wars: Droids (1985–86) Star Wars: Ewoks (1985–86) Maniac Mansion (1990–93) The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles (1992–93) Star Wars: Clone Wars (2003–05) Star Wars: The Clone Wars (2008–14) Star Wars Rebels (2014–present) Lego Star Wars: The Freemaker Adventures (2016–present) Star Wars Detours (unaired)TV filmsCaravan of Courage: An Ewok Adventure (1984) Ewoks: The Battle for Endor (1985)Theme parkfilmsCaptain EO (1986) Star Tours (1987) ExtraTERRORestrial Alien Encounter (1995) Star Tours – The Adventures Continue (2011)FranchisesStar Wars Indiana JonesRelatedproductionsTHX 1138 (1971)DivisionsIndustrial Light & Magic Skywalker Sound Lucasfilm Animation LucasArtsFormer divisionsThe Droid Works EditDroid Graphics Group (Pixar) Kerner Optical SoundDroid THXPeopleGeorge Lucas (Founder) Kathleen Kennedy (President) Howard Roffman (EVP, Franchise Management)Parent: Walt Disney Studios (The Walt Disney Company)[hide] v t eDisney Consumer Products and Interactive MediaLicensing Disney Retail Disney StorePublishing andDigital MediaDisney Publishing WorldwideDisney comics Disney English Disney Press Disney Hyperion Marvel Press (joint w/Marvel)Disney Digital NetworkMaker Studios Babble.com Disney.com Go.comGames and InteractiveExperiencesDCPI Labs The Muppets Studio Disney Interactive Studios Disney Mobile PlaydomFranchisesDisney Channels Worldwide Disney Junior Elena of Avalor Gravity Falls Kim Possible Phineas and Ferb Star vs. the Forces of Evil Disney comics Donald Duck universe Disney Fairies Disney Princess Disney Tsum Tsum Disney Villains Disney Interactive Club Penguin Disney Infinity Kingdom Hearts Where's My Water? Frozen The Kingdom Keepers Marvel Lucasfilm Indiana Jones Star Wars Mickey & Friends The Muppets Pirates of the Caribbean Pixar Cars Finding Nemo The Incredibles Monsters Inc. Toy Story Tron Winnie the PoohOtherD23 Disney Comics Disney VaultThe Walt Disney Company[hide] v t eGeorge Lucas filmographyFilms directedFeatureTHX 1138 (1971) American Graffiti (1973) Star Wars (1977) Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace (1999) Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones (2002) Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith (2005)ShortLook at Life (1965) Herbie (1965) Freiheit (1966) 1:42.08 (1966) Electronic Labyrinth: THX 1138 4EB (1967) The Emperor (1967) Anyone Lived in a Pretty How Town (1967) 6-18-67 (1967) Filmmaker (1968) Bald: The Making of THX 1138 (1971, uncredited) Star Wars Episode II: The Saga Continues (2000)Films writtenThe Empire Strikes Back (1980) Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) Return of the Jedi (1983) Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984) Captain EO (1986) Willow (1988) Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989) Radioland Murders (1994) Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008) Strange Magic (2015)TelevisionStar Wars Holiday Special (1978) Caravan of Courage: An Ewok Adventure (1984) Ewoks: The Battle for Endor (1985) Star Wars: Ewoks (1985-1986) Star Wars: Droids (1985-1986) The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles (1992-1996) Star Wars: Clone Wars (2003-2005) Star Wars: The Clone Wars (2008-2014) Star Wars Detours (TBA)RelatedAmerican Zoetrope Indiana Jones Lucasfilm ILM LucasArts Lucasfilm Animation Skywalker Sound Pixar Skywalker Ranch Star Wars The Star Wars Corporation THX Edutopia[hide] v t eHasbroIntellectual propertiescurrently managedby HasbroToysAction Man Baby Alive Blythe Easy-Bake Oven Furby G.I. Joe Glo Worm Jem Koosh Kre-O Lite-Brite Littlest Pet Shop Mighty Muggs Mr. Potato Head My Little Pony Nerf Play-Doh Pound Puppies Rubik's Cube Sit 'n Spin Spirograph Stickle Bricks Super Soaker Tinkertoy Tonka Transformers WeebleGamesAcquire Aggravation Axis & Allies Barrel of Monkeys Battleship Boggle Bop It Buckaroo! Candy Land Catch Phrase Chutes & Ladders Clue Connect 4 Cootie Cranium Crocodile Dentist Designer's World Duel Masters Dungeons & Dragons Elefun Gator Golf Girl Talk Guess Who? Hi Ho! Cherry-O Hungry Hungry Hippos Jenga Lazer Tag Life Magic: The Gathering Mall Madness Milton Monopoly Mouse Trap Mystery Date Nerf Blaster Operation Ouija Parcheesi Perfection Pictionary Pit Risk Rook Scattergories Scrabble (U.S. and Canada) Simon Sorry! Stratego Taboo Trivial Pursuit Trouble Twister Upwords YahtzeeDistributed worldwideby HasbroBeyblade (except Japan and parts of Asia) CirKis (except U.S., UK, France and Germany) FurReal Friends (except Japan) iDog (except Japan) Yo-kai Watch (except Asia)Licensed productsAre You Smarter than a 5th Grader? Disney Disney Princess Elena of Avalor Frozen Indiana Jones Marvel Legends Marvel Super Hero Squad Marvel Universe Spider-Man Classics Star Wars Idaten Jump Nickelodeon Strawberry Shortcake Sid the Science Kid The Simpsons Wolverine and the X-Men X-Men Origins: WolverineSubsidiariesEntertainment and Licensing Hasbro Studios Boulder Media Discovery Family (40%) Wizards of the Coast Avalon Hill Backflip Studios (70%)Divisions and brandsNerf Playskool Tiger Electronics TonkaRelated mediaComics Films TelevisionSee alsoHasbro Universe HasCon[hide] v t eUnofficial Star Wars mediaFan filmsThe Official Star Wars Fan Film Awards Star Wars Mini Movie Awards Broken Allegiance Chad Vader Crazy Watto The Dark Redemption Dark Resurrection Darth Vader's Psychic Hotline Duality The Formula George Lucas in Love Hardware Wars Harmy's Despecialized Edition How the Sith Stole Christmas The Jedi Hunter Knightquest Padmé The Phantom Edit Pink Five Pink Five Strikes Back Return of Pink Five Ryan vs. Dorkman Saving Star Wars Sith Apprentice Star Dudes Star Wars Gangsta Rap Star Wars: Revelations Star Wars: The Emperor's New Clones Star Wars: Threads of Destiny Thumb Wars Trooper Clerks TroopsOfficialmockumentariesReturn of the EwokThis watch is silver plated On April 10, 1912, the Titanic, largest ship afloat, left Southampton, England on her maiden voyage to New York City. The White Star Line had spared no expense in assuring her luxury. A legend even before she sailed, her passengers were a mixture of the world's wealthiest basking in the elegance of first class accommodations and immigrants packed into steerage.The Washington Post announces the disasterShe was touted as the safest ship ever built, so safe that she carried only 20 lifeboats - enough to provide accommodation for only half her 2,200 passengers and crew. This discrepancy rested on the belief that since the ship's construction made her "unsinkable," her lifeboats were necessary only to rescue survivors of other sinking ships. Additionally, lifeboats took up valuable deck space.Four days into her journey, at 11:40 P.M. on the night of April 14, she struck an iceberg. Her fireman compared the sound of the impact to "the tearing of calico, nothing more." However, the collision was fatal and the icy water soon poured through the ship.It became obvious that many would not find safety in a lifeboat. Each passenger was issued a life jacket but life expectancy would be short when exposed to water four degrees below freezing. As the forward portion of the ship sank deeper, passengers scrambled to the stern. John Thayer witnessed the sinking from a lifeboat. "We could see groups of the almost fifteen hundred people still aboard, clinging in clusters or bunches, like swarming bees; only to fall in masses, pairs or singly, as the great after part of the ship, two hundred and fifty feet of it, rose into the sky, till it reached a sixty-five or seventy degree angle." The great ship slowly slid beneath the waters two hours and forty minutes after the collisionThe next morning, the liner Carpathia rescued 705 survivors. One thousand five hundred twenty-two passengers and crew were lost. Subsequent inquiries attributed the high loss of life to an insufficient number of lifeboats and inadequate training in their use.End of a Splendid Journey - Elizabeth Shutes, aged 40, was governess to nineteen-year-old Margaret Graham who was traveling with her parents. As Shutes and her charge sit in their First Class cabin they feel a shudder travel through the ship. At first comforted by her belief in the safety of the ship, Elizabeth's composure is soon shattered by the realization of the imminent tragedy:"Suddenly a queer quivering ran under me, apparently the whole length of the ship. Startled by the very strangeness of the shivering motion, I sprang to the floor. With too perfect a trust in that mighty vessel I again lay down. Some one knocked at my door, and the voice of a friend said: 'Come quickly to my cabin; an iceberg has just passed our window; I know we have just struck one.'No confusion, no noise of any kind, one could believe no danger imminent. Our stewardess came and said she could learn nothing. Looking out into the companionway I saw heads appearing asking questions from half-closed doors. All sepulchrally still, no excitement. I sat down again. My friend was by this time dressed; still her daughter and I talked on, Margaret pretending to eat a sandwich. Her hand shook so that the bread kept parting company from the chicken. Then I saw she was frightened, and for the first time I was too, but why get dressed, as no one had given the slightest hint of any possible danger? An officer's cap passed the door. I asked: 'Is there an accident or danger of any kind? 'None, so far as I know', was his courteous answer, spoken quietly and most kindly. This same officer then entered a cabin a little distance down the companionway and, by this time distrustful of everything, I listened intently, and distinctly heard, 'We can keep the water out for a while.' Then, and not until then, did I realize the horror of an accident at sea. Now it was too late to dress; no time for a waist, but a coat and skirt were soon on; slippers were quicker than shoes; the stewardess put on our life-preservers, and we were just ready when Mr Roebling came to tell us he would make us to our friend's mother, who was waiting above ...Two lifeboats approach the Carpathia April 15, 1912No laughing throng, but on either side [of the staircases] stand quietly, bravely, the stewards, all equipped with the white, ghostly life-preservers. Always the thing one tries not to see even crossing a ferry. Now only pale faces, each form strapped about with those white bars. So gruesome a scene. We passed on. The awful good-byes. The quiet look of hope in the brave men's eyes as the wives were put into the lifeboats. Nothing escaped one at this fearful moment. We left from the sun deck, seventy-five feet above the water. Mr Case and Mr Roebling, brave American men, saw us to the lifeboat, made no effort to save themselves, but stepped back on deck. Later they went to an honoured grave.Our lifeboat, with thirty-six in it, began lowering to the sea. This was done amid the greatest confusion. Rough seamen all giving different orders. No officer aboard. As only one side of the ropes worked, the lifeboat at one time was in such a position that it seemed we must capsize in mid-air. At last the ropes worked together, and we drew nearer and nearer the black, oily water. The first touch of our lifeboat on that black sea came to me as a last good-bye to life, and so we put off - a tiny boat on a great sea - rowed away from what had been a safe home for five days.The first wish on the part of all was to stay near the Titanic. We all felt so much safer near the ship. Surely such a vessel could not sink. I thought the danger must be exaggerated, and we could all be taken aboard again. But surely the outline of that great, good ship was growing less. The bow of the boat was getting black. Light after light was disappearing, and now those rough seamen put to their oars and we were told to hunt under seats, any place, anywhere, for a lantern, a light of any kind. Every place was empty. There was no water - no stimulant of any kind. Not a biscuit - nothing to keep us alive had we drifted long...Sitting by me in the lifeboat were a mother and daughter. The mother had left a husband on the Titanic, and the daughter a father Survivors on the deck of the Carpathiaand husband, and while we were near the other boats those two stricken women would call out a name and ask, 'Are you there?' 'No,'would come back the awful answer, but these brave women never lost courage, forgot their own sorrow, telling me to sit close to them to keep warm... The life-preservers helped to keep us warm, but the night was bitter cold, and it grew colder and colder, and just before dawn, the coldest, darkest hour of all, no help seemed possible......The stars slowly disappeared, and in their place came the faint pink glow of another day. Then I heard, 'A light, a ship.' I could not, would not, look while there was a bit of doubt, but kept my eyes away. All night long I had heard, 'A light!' Each time it proved to be one of our other lifeboats, someone lighting a piece of paper, anything they could find to burn, and now I could not believe. Someone found a newspaper; it was lighted and held up. Then I looked and saw a ship. A ship bright with lights; strong and steady she waited, and we were to be saved. A straw hat was offered it would burn longer. That same ship that had come to save us might run us down. But no; she is still. The two, the ship and the dawn, came together, a living painting."RMS Titanic was a passenger liner that struck an iceberg on her maiden voyage from Southampton, England, to New York City, and sank on 15 April 1912, resulting in the deaths of 1,517 people in one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history.The largest passenger steamship in the world at the time, the Olympic-class RMS Titanic was owned by the White Star Line and constructed at the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast, Ireland, UK. After setting sail for New York City on 10 April 1912 with 2,223 people on board, she hit the iceberg four days into the crossing, at 11:40 pm on 14 April 1912, and sank at 2:20 am the following morning. The high casualty rate resulting from the sinking was due in part to the fact that, although complying with the regulations of the time, the ship carried lifeboats for only 1,178 people. A disproportionate number of men died due to the "women and children first" protocol that was enforced by the ship's crew.Titanic was designed by experienced engineers, using some of the most advanced technologies and extensive safety features of the time. The sinking of a passenger liner on her maiden voyage, the high loss of life and media frenzy over Titanic's famous victims, the legends about the sinking, the resulting changes in maritime law, and the discovery of the wreck have all contributed to the enduring interest in Titanic. A pocket watch (or pocketwatch) is a watch that is made to be carried in a pocket, as opposed to a wristwatch, which is strapped to the wrist. They were the most common type of watch from their development in the 16th century until wristwatches became popular after World War I during which a transitional design, trench watches, were used by the military. Pocket watches generally have an attached chain to allow them to be secured to a waistcoat, lapel, or belt loop, and to prevent them from being dropped. Watches were also mounted on a short leather strap or fob, when a long chain would have been cumbersome or likely to catch on things. This fob could also provide a protective flap over their face and crystal. Women's watches were normally of this form, with a watch fob that was more decorative than protective. Chains were frequently decorated with a silver or enamel pendant, often carrying the arms of some club or society, which by association also became known as a fob. Ostensibly "practical" gadgets such as a watch winding key, vesta case or a cigar cutter also appeared on watch chains, although usually in an overly decorated style. Also common are fasteners designed to be put through a buttonhole and worn in a jacket or waistcoat, this sort being frequently associated with and named after train conductors. An early reference to the pocket watch is in a letter in November 1462 from the Italian clockmaker Bartholomew Manfredi to the Marchese di Mantova Federico Gonzaga[citation needed], where he offers him a "pocket clock" better than that belonging to the Duke of Modena. By the end of the 15th Century, spring-driven clocks appeared in Italy, and in Germany. Peter Henlein, a master locksmith of Nuremberg, was regularly manufacturing pocket watches by 1524. Thereafter, pocket watch manufacture spread throughout the rest of Europe as the 16th century progressed. Early watches only had an hour hand, the minute hand appearing in the late 17th century.[1][2] The first American pocket watches with machine made parts were manufactured by Henry Pitkin with his brother in the later 1830s. Jewellery Forms Anklet Belt buckle Belly chain Bindi Bracelet Brooch Chatelaine Collar pin Crown Cufflink Earring Lapel pin Necklace Pendant Ring Tiara Tie clip Tie pin Toe ring Watch pocket Making People Bench jeweler Clockmaker Goldsmith Silversmith Jewelry designer Lapidary Watchmaker Processes Casting centrifugal lost-wax vacuum Enameling Engraving Filigree Metal clay Plating Polishing Repoussé and chasing Soldering Stonesetting Wire sculpture Wire wrapped jewelry Tools Draw plate File Hammer Mandrel Pliers Materials Precious metals Gold Palladium Platinum Rhodium Silver Precious metal alloys Britannia silver Colored gold Crown gold Electrum Shakudō Shibuichi Sterling silver Tumbaga Base metals Brass Bronze Copper Mokume-gane Pewter Stainless steel Titanium Tungsten Mineral gemstones Aventurine Agate Amethyst Beryl Carnelian Chrysoberyl Diamond Diopside Emerald Garnet Jade Jasper Lapis lazuli Larimar Malachite Marcasite Moonstone Obsidian Onyx Opal Peridot Quartz Ruby Sapphire Sodalite Sunstone Tanzanite Tiger's eye Topaz Tourmaline Turquoise Yogo sapphire Organic gemstones Abalone Amber Ammolite Copal Coral Ivory Jet Pearl Nacre Other natural objects Shell jewelry Terms Carat (mass) Carat (purity) Finding Millesimal fineness A watch is a timepiece, typically worn either around the wrist or attached on a chain and carried in a pocket. Wristwatches are the most common type of watch used today. Watches evolved in the 17th century from spring powered clocks, which appeared in the 15th century. The first watches were strictly mechanical. As technology progressed, the mechanisms used to measure time have, in some cases, been replaced by use of quartz vibrations or electronic pulses.[1] The first digital electronic watch was developed in 1970.[2]Before wristwatches became popular in the 1920s, most watches were pocket watches, which often had covers and were carried in a pocket and attached to a watch chain or watch fob.[3] In the early 1900s, the wristwatch, originally called a Wristlet, was reserved for women and considered more of a passing fad than a serious timepiece. Men, who carried pocket watches, were quoted as saying they would "sooner wear a skirt as wear a wristwatch".[4] This changed in World War I, when soldiers on the battlefield found pocket watches to be impractical and attached their watches to their wrist by a cupped leather strap. It is also believed that Girard-Perregaux equipped the German Imperial Navy with wristwatches in a similar fashion as early as the 1880s, to be used while synchronizing naval attacks and firing artillery.[4]Most inexpensive and medium-priced watches used mainly for timekeeping are electronic watches with quartz movements.[1] Expensive collectible watches, valued more for their workmanship and aesthetic appeal than for simple timekeeping, often have purely mechanical movements and are powered by springs, even though mechanical movements are less accurate than more affordable quartz movements. In addition to the time, modern watches often display the day, date, month and year, and electronic watches may have many other functions. Watches that provide additional time-related features such as timers, chronographs and alarm functions are not uncommon. Some modern designs even go as far as using GPS[5] technology or heart-rate monitoring[6] capabilities.The study of timekeeping is known as horology.Time measurement and standardsMajor subjects Time Chronometry Orders of magnitude MetrologyInternational standards UTC UTC offset UT ΔT DUT1 IERS ISO 31-1 ISO 8601 TAI 12-hour clock 24-hour clock Barycentric Coordinate Time Civil time Daylight saving time Geocentric Coordinate Time International Date Line Leap second Solar time Terrestrial Time Time zoneObsolete standards Barycentric Dynamical Time Ephemeris time Greenwich Mean Time Prime meridianTime in physics Absolute time and space Spacetime Chronon Continuous time Coordinate time Cosmological decade Discrete time Planck epoch Planck time Proper time Theory of relativity Time dilation Gravitational time dilation Time domain T-symmetryHorology Clock Astrarium Atomic clock Complication Equation of time History of timekeeping devices Hourglass Marine chronometer Marine sandglass Radio clock Sundial Watch Water clockCalendar Astronomical Dominical letter Epact Equinox Gregorian Hebrew Hindu Intercalation Islamic Julian Leap year Lunar Lunisolar Seven-day week Solar Solstice Tropical year Weekday determination Weekday namesArchaeology and geology Dating methodologies Geologic time scale International Commission on StratigraphyAstronomical chronology Galactic year Nuclear time scale Precession Sidereal timeUnits of time Century Day Decade Fortnight Hour Jiffy Lustrum Millennium Minute Month Paksha Saeculum Second Shake Tide Week YearRelated topics Chronology Duration Mental chronometry Metric time System time Time value of money Timekeeper Titanic is still the second highest grossing film of all time .... see list below Rank Title Studio Worldwide Domestic / % Overseas / % Year^1 Avatar Fox $2,788.0 $760.5 27.3% $2,027.5 72.7% 2009^2 Titanic Par. $2,186.8 $658.7 30.1% $1,528.1 69.9% 1997^3 Star Wars: The Force Awakens BV $2,068.2 $936.7 45.3% $1,131.6 54.7% 20154 Jurassic World Uni. $1,670.4 $652.3 39.0% $1,018.1 61.0% 20155 Marvel's The Avengers BV $1,518.8 $623.4 41.0% $895.5 59.0% 20126 Furious 7 Uni. $1,516.0 $353.0 23.3% $1,163.0 76.7% 20157 Avengers: Age of Ultron BV $1,405.4 $459.0 32.7% $946.4 67.3% 20158 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 WB $1,341.5 $381.0 28.4% $960.5 71.6% 20119 Frozen BV $1,276.5 $400.7 31.4% $875.7 68.6% 201310 Iron Man 3 BV $1,214.8 $409.0 33.7% $805.8 66.3% 201311 Minions Uni. $1,159.4 $336.0 29.0% $823.4 71.0% 201512 Captain America: Civil War BV $1,153.3 $408.1 35.4% $745.2 64.6% 201613 Transformers: Dark of the Moon P/DW $1,123.8 $352.4 31.4% $771.4 68.6% 201114 The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King NL $1,119.9 $377.8 33.7% $742.1 66.3% 2003^15 Skyfall Sony $1,108.6 $304.4 27.5% $804.2 72.5% 201216 Transformers: Age of Extinction Par. $1,104.1 $245.4 22.2% $858.6 77.8% 201417 Beauty and the Beast (2017) BV $1,100.3 $471.1 42.8% $629.2 57.2% 201718 The Dark Knight Rises WB $1,084.9 $448.1 41.3% $636.8 58.7% 201219 Toy Story 3 BV $1,067.0 $415.0 38.9% $652.0 61.1% 201020 Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest BV $1,066.2 $423.3 39.7% $642.9 60.3% 200621 Rogue One: A Star Wars Story BV $1,055.9 $532.1 50.4% $523.8 49.6% 201622 Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides BV $1,045.7 $241.1 23.1% $804.6 76.9% 201123 Jurassic Park Uni. $1,029.2 $402.5 39.1% $626.7 60.9% 1993^24 Finding Dory BV $1,028.6 $486.3 47.3% $542.3 52.7% 201625 Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace Fox $1,027.0 $474.5 46.2% $552.5 53.8% 1999^26 Alice in Wonderland (2010) BV $1,025.5 $334.2 32.6% $691.3 67.4% 201027 Zootopia BV $1,023.8 $341.3 33.3% $682.5 66.7% 201628 The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey WB (NL) $1,021.1 $303.0 29.7% $718.1 70.3% 201229 The Dark Knight WB $1,004.6 $534.9 53.2% $469.7 46.8% 2008^30 Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone WB $974.8 $317.6 32.6% $657.2 67.4% 200131 Despicable Me 2 Uni. $970.8 $368.1 37.9% $602.7 62.1% 201332 The Lion King BV $968.5 $422.8 43.7% $545.7 56.3% 1994^33 The Jungle Book (2016) BV $966.6 $364.0 37.7% $602.5 62.3% 201634 Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End BV $963.4 $309.4 32.1% $654.0 67.9% 200735 Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1 WB $960.3 $296.0 30.8% $664.3 69.2% 201036 The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug WB (NL) $958.4 $258.4 27.0% $700.0 73.0% 201337 The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies WB (NL) $956.0 $255.1 26.7% $700.9 73.3% 201438 Finding Nemo BV $940.3 $380.8 40.5% $559.5 59.5% 2003^39 Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix WB $939.9 $292.0 31.1% $647.9 68.9% 200740 Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince WB $934.4 $302.0 32.3% $632.5 67.7% 200941 The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers NL $926.0 $342.6 37.0% $583.5 63.0% 2002^42 Shrek 2 DW $919.8 $441.2 48.0% $478.6 52.0% 200443 The Fate of the Furious Uni. $908.4 $163.6 18.0% $744.8 82.0% 201744 Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire WB $896.9 $290.0 32.3% $606.9 67.7% 200545 Spider-Man 3 Sony $890.9 $336.5 37.8% $554.3 62.2% 200746 Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs Fox $886.7 $196.6 22.2% $690.1 77.8% 200947 Spectre Sony $880.7 $200.1 22.7% $680.6 77.3% 201548 Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets WB $879.0 $262.0 29.8% $617.0 70.2% 200249 Ice Age: Continental Drift Fox $877.2 $161.3 18.4% $715.9 81.6% 201250 The Secret Life of Pets Uni. $875.5 $368.4 42.1% $507.1 57.9% 201651 Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice WB $873.3 $330.4 37.8% $542.9 62.2% 201652 The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring NL $871.5 $315.5 36.2% $556.0 63.8% 2001^53 The Hunger Games: Catching Fire LGF $865.0 $424.7 49.1% $440.3 50.9% 201354 Inside Out BV $857.6 $356.5 41.6% $501.1 58.4% 201555 Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith Fox $848.8 $380.3 44.8% $468.5 55.2% 2005^56 Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen P/DW $836.3 $402.1 48.1% $434.2 51.9% 200957 The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2 LG/S $829.7 $292.3 35.2% $537.4 64.8% 201258 Inception WB $825.5 $292.6 35.4% $533.0 64.6% 201059 Spider-Man Sony $821.7 $403.7 49.1% $418.0 50.9% 200260 Independence Day Fox $817.4 $306.2 37.5% $511.2 62.5% 1996^61 Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them WB $814.0 $234.0 28.8% $580.0 71.2% 201662 Shrek the Third P/DW $799.0 $322.7 40.4% $476.2 59.6% 200763 Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban WB $796.7 $249.5 31.3% $547.1 68.7% 200464 E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial Uni. $792.9 $435.1 54.9% $357.8 45.1% 1982^65 Fast & Furious 6 Uni. $788.7 $238.7 30.3% $550.0 69.7% 201366 Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull Par. $786.6 $317.1 40.3% $469.5 59.7% 200867 Spider-Man 2 Sony $783.8 $373.6 47.7% $410.2 52.3% 200468 Deadpool Fox $783.1 $363.1 46.4% $420.0 53.6% 201669 Star Wars Fox $775.4 $461.0 59.5% $314.4 40.5% 1977^70 Guardians of the Galaxy BV $773.3 $333.2 43.1% $440.2 56.9% 201471 2012 Sony $769.7 $166.1 21.6% $603.6 78.4% 200972 Maleficent BV $758.5 $241.4 31.8% $517.1 68.2% 201473 The Da Vinci Code Sony $758.2 $217.5 28.7% $540.7 71.3% 200674 The Amazing Spider-Man Sony $757.9 $262.0 34.6% $495.9 65.4% 201275 The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1 LGF $755.4 $337.1 44.6% $418.2 55.4% 201476 Shrek Forever After P/DW $752.6 $238.7 31.7% $513.9 68.3% 201077 X-Men: Days of Future Past Fox $747.9 $233.9 31.3% $513.9 68.7% 201478 Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted P/DW $746.9 $216.4 29.0% $530.5 71.0% 201279 Suicide Squad WB $745.6 $325.1 43.6% $420.5 56.4% 201680 The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe BV $745.0 $291.7 39.2% $453.3 60.8% 200581 Monsters University BV $744.2 $268.5 36.1% $475.7 63.9% 201382 The Matrix Reloaded WB $742.1 $281.6 37.9% $460.6 62.1% 200383 Up BV $735.1 $293.0 39.9% $442.1 60.1% 200984 Gravity WB $723.2 $274.1 37.9% $449.1 62.1% 201385 Captain America: The Winter Soldier BV $714.3 $259.8 36.4% $454.5 63.6% 201486 The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1 Sum. $712.2 $281.3 39.5% $430.9 60.5% 201187 Dawn of the Planet of the Apes Fox $710.6 $208.5 29.3% $502.1 70.7% 201488 The Twilight Saga: New Moon Sum. $709.7 $296.6 41.8% $413.1 58.2% 200989 Transformers P/DW $709.7 $319.2 45.0% $390.5 55.0% 200790 The Amazing Spider-Man 2 Sony $709.0 $202.9 28.6% $506.1 71.4% 201491 The Twilight Saga: Eclipse Sum. $698.5 $300.5 43.0% $398.0 57.0% 201092 Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol Par. $694.7 $209.4 30.1% $485.3 69.9% 201193 The Hunger Games LGF $694.4 $408.0 58.8% $286.4 41.2% 201294 Mission: Impossible - Rogue Nation Par. $682.7 $195.0 28.6% $487.7 71.4% 201595 Forrest Gump Par. $677.9 $330.3 48.7% $347.7 51.3% 1994^96 Doctor Strange BV $677.6 $232.6 34.3% $444.9 65.7% 201697 Interstellar Par. $675.1 $188.0 27.8% $487.1 72.2% 201498 The Sixth Sense BV $672.8 $293.5 43.6% $379.3 56.4% 199999 Man of Steel WB $668.0 $291.0 43.6% $377.0 56.4% 2013100 Kung Fu Panda 2 P/DW $665.7 $165.2 24.8% $500.4 75.2% 2011 Titanic is a 1997 American epic romance-disaster film directed, written, co-produced, and co-edited by James Cameron. A fictionalized account of the sinking of the RMS Titanic, it stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet as members of different social classes who fall in love aboard the ship during its ill-fated maiden voyage.Cameron's inspiration for the film came from his fascination with shipwrecks; he felt a love story interspersed with the human loss would be essential to convey the emotional impact of the disaster. Production began in 1995, when Cameron shot footage of the actual Titanic wreck. The modern scenes on the research vessel were shot on board the Akademik Mstislav Keldysh, which Cameron had used as a base when filming the wreck. Scale models, computer-generated imagery, and a reconstruction of the Titanic built at Playas de Rosarito in Baja California were used to re-create the sinking. The film was partially funded by Paramount Pictures and 20th Century Fox. It was the most expensive film made at that time, with an estimated budget of $200 million.Upon its release on December 19, 1997, Titanic achieved critical and commercial success. Nominated for fourteen Academy Awards, it tied All About Eve (1950) for the most Oscar nominations, and won eleven, including the awards for Best Picture and Best Director, tying Ben Hur (1959) for the most Oscars won by a single film. With an initial worldwide gross of over $1.84 billion, Titanic was the first film to reach the billion-dollar mark. It remained the highest-grossing film of all time until Cameron's 2009 film Avatar surpassed it in 2010. A 3D version of Titanic, released on April 4, 2012 to commemorate the centennial of the sinking, earned it an additional $343.6 million worldwide, pushing the film's worldwide total to $2.18 billion. It became the second film to gross more than $2 billion worldwide (after Avatar). Directed byJames CameronProduced byJames CameronJon LandauWritten byJames CameronStarringLeonardo DiCaprioKate WinsletBilly ZaneKathy BatesFrances FisherBernard HillJonathan HydeDanny NucciDavid WarnerBill PaxtonMusic by James HornerCinematographyRussell CarpenterEdited byConrad BuffJames CameronRichard A. HarrisProductioncompanyParamount Pictures[1]20th Century Fox [1]Lightstorm Entertainment[1]Distributed byParamount Pictures(North America)20th Century Fox(International)Release dateNovember 1, 1997 (Tokyo)December 19, 1997 (United States)Running time195 minutes[2]CountryUnited StatesLanguageEnglishBudget$200 million[3][4][5]Box office$2.187 billion PlotIn 1996, treasure hunter Brock Lovett and his team aboard the research vessel Akademik Mstislav Keldysh search the wreck of RMS Titanic for a necklace with a rare diamond, the Heart of the Ocean. They recover a safe containing a drawing of a young woman wearing only the necklace dated April 14, 1912, the day the ship struck the iceberg.[Note 1] Rose Dawson Calvert, the woman in the drawing, is brought aboard Keldysh and tells Lovett of her experiences aboard Titanic.In 1912 Southampton, 17-year-old first-class passenger Rose DeWitt Bukater, her fiancé Cal Hockley, and her mother Ruth board the luxurious Titanic. Ruth emphasizes that Rose's marriage will resolve their family's financial problems and retain their high-class persona. Distraught over the engagement, Rose considers suicide by jumping from the stern; Jack Dawson, a penniless artist, intervenes and discourages her. Discovered with Jack, Rose tells a concerned Cal that she was peering over the edge and Jack saved her from falling. When Cal becomes indifferent, she suggests to him that Jack deserves a reward. He invites Jack to dine with them in first class the following night. Jack and Rose develop a tentative friendship, despite Cal and Ruth being wary of him. Following dinner, Rose secretly joins Jack at a party in third class.Aware of Cal and Ruth's disapproval, Rose rebuffs Jack's advances, but realizes she prefers him over Cal. After rendezvousing on the bow at sunset, Rose takes Jack to her state room; at her request, Jack sketches Rose posing nude wearing Cal's engagement present, the Heart of the Ocean necklace. They evade Cal's bodyguard and have sex in an automobile inside the cargo hold. On the forward deck, they witness a collision with an iceberg and overhear the officers and designer discussing its seriousness.Cal discovers Jack's sketch of Rose and an insulting note from her in his safe along with the necklace. When Jack and Rose attempt to inform Cal of the collision, he has his bodyguard slip the necklace into Jack's pocket and accuses him of theft. Jack is arrested, taken to the master-at-arms' office, and handcuffed to a pipe. Cal puts the necklace in his own coat pocket.With the ship sinking, Rose flees Cal and her mother, who has boarded a lifeboat, and frees Jack. On the boat deck, Cal and Jack encourage her to board a lifeboat; Cal claims he can get himself and Jack off safely. After Rose boards one, Cal tells Jack the arrangement is only for himself. As her boat lowers, Rose decides that she cannot leave Jack and jumps back on board. Cal takes his bodyguard's pistol and chases Rose and Jack into the flooding first-class dining saloon. After using up his ammunition, Cal realizes he gave his coat and consequently the necklace to Rose. He later boards a collapsible lifeboat by carrying a lost child.After braving several obstacles, Jack and Rose return to the boat deck. The lifeboats have departed and passengers are falling to their deaths as the stern rises out of the water. The ship breaks in half, lifting the stern into the air. Jack and Rose ride it into the ocean and he helps her onto a wooden panel only buoyant enough for one person. He assures her that she will die an old woman, warm in her bed. Jack dies of hypothermia[7] but Rose is saved.With Rose hiding from Cal en route, the RMS Carpathia takes the survivors to New York City where Rose gives her name as Rose Dawson. She later finds out Cal committed suicide after losing all his money in the 1929 Wall Street crash.Back in the present, Lovett decides to abandon his search after hearing Rose's story. Alone on the stern of Keldysh, Rose takes out the Heart of the Ocean — in her possession all along — and drops it into the sea over the wreck site. While she is seemingly asleep or has died in her bed, photos on her dresser depict a life of freedom and adventure inspired by the life she wanted to live with Jack. A young Rose reunites with Jack at the Titanic's Grand Staircase, applauded by those who died.CastFictional characters Leonardo DiCaprio (top), who portrayed Jack Dawson, and Kate Winslet (bottom), who portrayed Rose DeWitt Bukater.Leonardo DiCaprio as Jack Dawson: Cameron said he needed the cast to feel as though they were really on the Titanic, to relive its liveliness, and "to take that energy and give it to Jack, [...] an artist who is able to have his heart soar".[8] Jack is portrayed as an itinerant, poor orphan from Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, who has toured numerous places in the world, including Paris. He wins two tickets onto the RMS Titanic in a poker game and travels as a third-class passenger with his friend Fabrizio. He is attracted to Rose at first sight and meets her when she contemplates throwing herself off the stern of the ship. Her fiance's "reward", an invitation to dine with them the next evening, enables Jack to mix with the first-class passengers for a night. When casting the role, various established actors, including Matthew McConaughey, Chris O'Donnell, Billy Crudup, and Stephen Dorff, were considered, but Cameron felt that a few of the actors were too old for the part of a 20-year-old.[9][10][11][12] Tom Cruise was interested in portraying the character, but his asking price was too much for the studio to consider.[10] Cameron considered Jared Leto for the role, but Leto refused to audition.[13] DiCaprio, 21 years old at the time, was brought to Cameron's attention by casting director Mali Finn.[9] Initially, he did not want to portray the character and refused to read his first romantic scene on the set (see below). Cameron said, "He read it once, then started goofing around, and I could never get him to focus on it again. But for one split second, a shaft of light came down from the heavens and lit up the forest." Cameron strongly believed in DiCaprio's acting ability and told him, "Look, I'm not going to make this guy brooding and neurotic. I'm not going to give him a tic and a limp and all the things you want." Cameron rather envisioned the character as a James Stewart type.[9] Although Jack Dawson was a fictional character, in Fairview Cemetery in Halifax, Nova Scotia, where 121 victims are buried, there is a grave labeled "J. Dawson". The real J. Dawson was Joseph Dawson, who shoveled coal in the bowels of the ship. "It wasn't until after the movie came out that we found out that there was a J. Dawson gravestone," said the film's producer, Jon Landau, in an interview.[14]Kate Winslet as Rose DeWitt Bukater: Cameron said Winslet "had the thing that you look for" and that there was "a quality in her face, in her eyes," that he "just knew people would be ready to go the distance with her".[8] Rose is a 17-year-old girl, originally from Philadelphia, who is forced into an engagement to 30-year-old Cal Hockley so she and her mother, Ruth, can maintain their high-class status after her father's death had left the family debt-ridden. Rose boards the RMS Titanic with Cal and Ruth, as a first-class passenger, and meets Jack. Winslet said of her character, "She has got a lot to give, and she's got a very open heart. And she wants to explore and adventure the world, but she [feels] that's not going to happen."[8] Gwyneth Paltrow, Winona Ryder, Claire Danes, and Gabrielle Anwar had been considered for the role.[9][15][16][17] When they turned it down, 20-year-old Winslet campaigned heavily for the role. She sent Cameron daily notes from England, which led Cameron to invite her to Hollywood for auditions. As with DiCaprio, casting director Mali Finn originally brought her to Cameron's attention. When looking for a Rose, Cameron described the character as "an Audrey Hepburn type" and was initially uncertain about casting Winslet even after her screen test impressed him.[9] After she screen tested with DiCaprio, Winslet was so thoroughly impressed with him, that she whispered to Cameron, "He's great. Even if you don't pick me, pick him." Winslet sent Cameron a single rose with a card signed, "From Your Rose", and lobbied him by phone. "You don't understand!" she pleaded one day when she reached him by mobile phone in his Humvee. "I am Rose! I don't know why you're even seeing anyone else!" Her persistence, as well as her talent, eventually convinced him to cast her in the role.[9]Billy Zane as Caledon Nathan "Cal" Hockley: Cal is Rose's 30-year-old fiancé. He is arrogant and snobbish, and the heir to a Pittsburgh steel fortune. He becomes increasingly embarrassed by, jealous of, and cruel about Rose's relationship with Jack. The part was originally offered to Matthew McConaughey.[10]Frances Fisher as Ruth DeWitt Bukater: Rose's widowed mother, who arranges her daughter's engagement to Cal to maintain her family's high-society status. She loves her daughter but believes that social position is more important than having a loving marriage. She scorns Jack, even though he saved her daughter's life.Gloria Stuart as Rose Dawson Calvert: Rose narrates the film in a modern-day framing device. Cameron stated, "In order to see the present and the past, I decided to create a fictional survivor who is [close to] 101 years, and she connects us in a way through history."[8] The 100-year-old Rose gives Lovett information regarding the "Heart of the Ocean" after he discovers a nude drawing of her in the wreck. She tells the story of her time aboard the ship, mentioning Jack for the first time since the sinking. At 87, Stuart had to be made up to look older for the role.[10] Of casting Stuart, Cameron stated, "My casting director found her. She was sent out on a mission to find retired actresses from the Golden Age of the thirties and forties."[18] Cameron said that he did not know who Stuart was, and Fay Wray was also considered for the role. "But [Stuart] was just so into it, and so lucid, and had such a great spirit. And I saw the connection between her spirit and [Winslet's] spirit," stated Cameron. "I saw this joie de vivre in both of them, that I thought the audience would be able to make that cognitive leap that it's the same person."[18] Stuart died on September 26, 2010, at age 100, approximately the same age elder Rose was in the film.[19]Bill Paxton as Brock Lovett: A treasure hunter looking for the "Heart of the Ocean" in the wreck of the Titanic in the present. Time and funding for his expedition are running out. He later reflects at the film's conclusion that, despite thinking about Titanic for three years, he has never understood it until he hears Rose's story.Suzy Amis as Lizzy Calvert: Rose's granddaughter, who accompanies her when she visits Lovett on the ship and learns her grandmother's true identity and romantic past with Jack Dawson.Danny Nucci as Fabrizio De Rossi: Jack's Italian best friend, who boards the RMS Titanic with him after Jack wins two tickets in a poker game. Fabrizio does not board a lifeboat when the Titanic sinks and is killed when one of the ship's funnels breaks and crashes into the water.David Warner as Spicer Lovejoy: An ex-Pinkerton constable, Lovejoy is Cal's English valet and bodyguard, who keeps an eye on Rose and is suspicious about the circumstances surrounding Jack's rescue of her. He dies when the Titanic splits in half, causing him to fall into a massive opening.Jason Barry as Thomas "Tommy" Ryan: An Irish third-class passenger who befriends Jack and Fabrizio. Tommy is killed when he is accidentally pushed forward and shot by a panicked First Officer Murdoch.Historical charactersAlthough not intended to be an entirely accurate depiction of events,[20] the film includes portrayals of several historical figures: The real Margaret Brown (right) giving Captain Arthur Henry Rostron an award for his service in the rescue of Titanic's surviving passengers.Kathy Bates as Margaret "Molly" Brown: Brown is looked down upon by other first-class women, including Ruth, as "vulgar" and "new money". She is friendly to Jack and lends him a tuxedo (bought for her son) when he is invited to dinner in the first-class dining saloon. Although Brown was a real person, Cameron chose not to portray her real-life actions. Molly Brown was dubbed "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" by historians because she, with the support of other women, commandeered Lifeboat 6 from Quartermaster Robert Hichens.[21] Some aspects of this altercation are portrayed in Cameron's film.Victor Garber as Thomas Andrews: The ship's builder, Andrews is portrayed as a very kind and pleasant man who is modest about his grand achievement. After the collision, he tries to convince the others, particularly Ismay, that it is a "mathematical certainty" that the ship will sink. He is depicted during the sinking of the ship as standing next to the clock in the first-class smoking room, lamenting his failure to build a strong and safe ship. Although this has become one of the most famous legends of the sinking of the Titanic, this story, which was published in a 1912 book (Thomas Andrews: Shipbuilder) and therefore perpetuated, came from John Stewart, a steward on the ship who in fact left the ship in boat n. 15 at approximately 1:40 a.m.[22] There were testimonies of sightings of Andrews after that moment.[22] It appears that Andrews stayed in the smoking room for some time to gather his thoughts, then he continued assisting with the evacuation.[22] Another reported sighting was of Andrews frantically throwing deck chairs into the ocean for passengers to use as floating devices. Andrews was last seen leaving the ship at the last moment.Bernard Hill as Captain Edward John Smith: Smith planned to make the Titanic his final voyage before retiring. He retreats into the wheelhouse on the bridge as the ship sinks, dying when the windows implode from the water whilst he clings to the ship's wheel. There are conflicting accounts as to whether he died in this manner or later froze to death in the water near the capsized collapsible lifeboat "B".[23]Jonathan Hyde as J. Bruce Ismay: Ismay is portrayed as a rich, ignorant upper-class man. In the film, he uses his position as White Star Line managing director to influence Captain Smith to go faster with the prospect of an earlier arrival in New York and favorable press attention; while this action appears in popular portrayals of the disaster, it is unsupported by evidence.[24][25] After the collision, he struggles to comprehend that his "unsinkable" ship is doomed. Ismay later boards Collapsible C (one of the last lifeboats to leave the ship) just before it is lowered. He was branded a coward by the press and public for surviving the disaster while many women and children had drowned.Eric Braeden as John Jacob Astor IV: A first-class passenger whom Rose (correctly) calls the richest man on the ship. The film depicts Astor and his 18-year-old wife Madeleine (Charlotte Chatton) as being introduced to Jack by Rose in the first-class dining saloon. During the introduction, Astor asks if Jack is connected to the "Boston Dawsons", a question Jack neatly deflects by saying that he is instead affiliated with the Chippewa Falls Dawsons. Astor is last seen as the Grand Staircase glass dome implodes and water surges in.Bernard Fox as Colonel Archibald Gracie IV: The film depicts Gracie making a comment to Cal that "women and machinery don't mix", and congratulating Jack for saving Rose from falling off the ship, though he is unaware that it was a suicide attempt. Fox had portrayed Frederick Fleet in the 1958 film A Night to Remember.Michael Ensign as Benjamin Guggenheim: A mining magnate traveling in first-class. He shows off his French mistress Madame Aubert (Fannie Brett) to his fellow passengers while his wife and three daughters wait for him at home. When Jack joins the other first-class passengers for dinner after his rescue of Rose, Guggenheim refers to him as a "bohemian". He is seen in the flooding Grand Staircase during the sinking, saying he is prepared to go down as a gentleman.Jonathan Evans-Jones as Wallace Hartley: The ship's bandmaster and violinist who plays uplifting music with his colleagues on the boat deck as the ship sinks. As the final plunge begins, he leads the band in a final performance of Nearer, My God, to Thee, to the tune of Bethany,[26][27] and dies in the sinking.Mark Lindsay Chapman as Chief Officer Henry Wilde: The ship's chief officer, who lets Cal on board a lifeboat because he has a child in his arms. Before he dies, he tries to get the boats to return to the sinking site to rescue passengers by blowing his whistle. After he freezes to death, Rose uses his whistle to attract the attention of Fifth Officer Lowe, which leads to her rescue.Ewan Stewart as First Officer William Murdoch: The officer who is put in charge of the bridge on the night the ship struck the iceberg. During a rush for the lifeboats, Murdoch shoots Tommy Ryan as well as another passenger in a momentary panic, then commits suicide out of guilt. When Murdoch's nephew Scott saw the film, he objected to his uncle's portrayal as damaging to Murdoch's heroic reputation.[28] A few months later, Fox vice-president Scott Neeson went to Dalbeattie, Scotland, where Murdoch lived, to deliver a personal apology, and also presented a £5000 donation to Dalbeattie High School to boost the school's William Murdoch Memorial Prize.[29] Cameron apologized on the DVD commentary, but stated that there were officers who fired gunshots to enforce the "women and children first" policy.[30] According to Cameron, his depiction of Murdoch is that of an "honorable man," not of a man "gone bad" or of a "cowardly murderer." He added, "I'm not sure you'd find that same sense of responsibility and total devotion to duty today. This guy had half of his lifeboats launched before his counterpart on the port side had even launched one. That says something about character and heroism."[31]Jonathan Phillips as Second Officer Charles Lightoller. The film depicts Lightoller informing Captain Smith that it will be difficult to see icebergs without breaking water. He is seen brandishing a gun and threatening to use it to keep order. He can be seen on top of Collapsible B when the first funnel collapses. Lightoller was the most senior officer to have survived the disaster.Simon Crane as Fourth Officer Joseph Boxhall: The officer in charge of firing flares and manning Lifeboat 2 during the sinking. He is shown on the bridge wings helping the seamen firing the flares.Ioan Gruffudd as Fifth Officer Harold Lowe: The ship's only officer to lead a lifeboat to retrieve survivors of the sinking from the icy waters. The film depicts Lowe rescuing Rose.Edward Fletcher as Sixth Officer James Moody: The ship's only junior officer to have died in the sinking. The film depicts Moody admitting Jack and Fabrizio onto the ship only moments before it departs from Southampton. Moody is later shown following Mr. Murdoch's orders to put the ship to full speed ahead, and informs First Officer Murdoch about the iceberg. He is last seen clinging to one of the davits on the starboard side after having unsuccessfully attempted to launch collapsible A.James Lancaster as Father Thomas Byles: Second-class passenger Father Byles, a Catholic priest from England, is portrayed praying and consoling passengers during the ship's final moments.Lew Palter and Elsa Raven as Isidor Straus and Ida Straus: Isidor is a former owner of R.H. Macy and Company, a former congressman from New York, and a member of the New York and New Jersey Bridge Commission. During the sinking, his wife Ida is offered a place in a lifeboat, but refuses, saying that she will honor her wedding pledge by staying with Isidor. They are last seen lying on their bed embracing each other as water fills their stateroom.Martin Jarvis as Sir Cosmo Duff-Gordon: A Scottish baronet who is rescued in Lifeboat 1. Lifeboats 1 and 2 were emergency boats with a capacity of 40. Situated at the forward end of the boat deck, these were kept ready to launch in case of a person falling overboard. On the night of the disaster, Lifeboat 1 was the fourth to be launched, with 12 people aboard, including Duff-Gordon, his wife and her secretary. The baronet was much criticized for his conduct during the incident. It was suggested that he had boarded the emergency boat in violation of the "women and children first" policy and that the boat had failed to return to rescue those struggling in the water. He offered five pounds to each of the lifeboat's crew, which those critical of his conduct viewed as a bribe. The Duff-Gordons at the time (and his wife's secretary in a letter written at the time and rediscovered in 2007) stated that there had been no women or children waiting to board in the vicinity of the launching of their boat, and there is confirmation that lifeboat 1 of the Titanic was almost empty and that First Officer William Murdoch was apparently glad to offer Duff-Gordon and his wife and her secretary a place (simply to fill it) after they had asked if they could get on. Duff-Gordon denied that his offer of money to the lifeboat crew represented a bribe. The British Board of Trade's inquiry into the disaster accepted Duff-Gordon's denial of bribing the crew, but maintained that, if the emergency boat had rowed towards the people who were in the water, it might very well have been able to rescue some of them.[32][33]Rosalind Ayres as Lady Duff-Gordon: A world-famous fashion designer and Sir Cosmo's wife. She is rescued in Lifeboat 1 with her husband. She and her husband never lived down rumors that they had forbidden the lifeboat's crew to return to the wreck site in case they would be swamped.[34][35][36]Rochelle Rose as Noël Leslie, Countess of Rothes: The Countess is shown to be friendly with Cal and the DeWitt Bukaters. Despite being of a higher status in society than Sir Cosmo and Lady Duff-Gordon, she is kind, and helps row the boat and even looks after the steerage passengers.Scott G. Anderson as Frederick Fleet: The lookout who saw the iceberg. Fleet escapes the sinking ship aboard Lifeboat 6.Paul Brightwell as Quartermaster Robert Hichens: One of the ship's six quartermasters and at the ship's wheel at the time of collision. He is in charge of lifeboat 6. He refuses to go back and pick up survivors after the sinking and eventually the boat is commandeered by Molly Brown.Martin East as Reginald Lee: The other lookout in the crow's nest. He survives the sinking.Gregory Cooke as Jack Phillips: Senior wireless operator on board the Titanic whom Captain Smith ordered to send the distress signal.Craig Kelly as Harold Bride: Junior wireless operator on board the Titanic.Liam Tuohy as Chief Baker Charles Joughin: The baker appears in the film on top of the railing with Jack and Rose as the ship sinks, drinking brandy from a flask. According to the real Joughin's testimony, he rode the ship down and stepped into the water without getting his hair wet. He also admitted to hardly feeling the cold, most likely thanks to alcohol.[37]Terry Forrestal as Chief Engineer Joseph G. Bell: Bell and his men worked until the last minute to keep the lights and the power on in order for distress signals to get out. Bell and all of the engineers died in the bowels of the Titanic.CameosSeveral crew members of the Akademik Mstislav Keldysh appear in the film, including Anatoly Sagalevich, creator and pilot of the MIR self-propelled Deep Submergence Vehicle.[38] Anders Falk, who filmed a documentary about the film's sets for the Titanic Historical Society, makes a cameo appearance in the film as a Swedish immigrant whom Jack Dawson meets when he enters his cabin; Edward Kamuda and Karen Kamuda, then President and Vice President of the Society who served as film consultants, were cast as extras in the film.[39][40]. this is silver plated Condition: New, Brand: Star Wars, Series/ Genre: Star Wars, Featured Characters: Star Wars, Sub-Genre: Empire Strikes Back (1980), Country/Region of Manufacture: United Kingdom, Sub-Type: Return of the Jedi (1983), Item: Pocket Watch

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